agglomeration

'i adore simple pleasures. they are the last refuge of the complex' [oscar wilde]

asylum-art:

Pencil Lamp by Michael & George

Designers from London Michael & George had the extravagant idea to imagine a lamp in the form of a giant pencil. A project where the light flashed from a light bulb placed at the gum called HB Pencil Lamp for sure that will change your interior. 

asylum-art:

Surreal Photo Manipulations By Ex-Ballet Dancer Kylli Sparre

Facebook | show in Amsterdam next month at Qlickeditions

Young or old, it’s never too late to change directions in life and begin chasing your dreams instead of just your obligations.  Photographer Kylli Sparre is a perfect example of this – she discovered that she wanted to be a photographer only after completing professional ballet school.

“When the studies were over, I realized it wasn’t the path for me. I have been searching for an outlet for my creativity ever since. [A few] years ago I found it in photography and never looked back,” writes the artist on her website. The influence of her professional ballet experience is clear in her current photography work – the models in her surreal and dream-like pictures are filled with grace, effortless poise, elegance and beauty.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Photographs and Watercolors Merge in Surreal Paintings by Aliza Razell

Using self-portrait photographs and watercolors, artist Aliza Razell has been exploring several abstract narratives by merging the two mediums in Photoshop. Her first series, Anesidora , involves the story of Pandora’s Jar (Pandora’s box was actually a jar, a detail misinterpreted in the 1400s), while the second is inspired by the Finnish word ikävä, meaning the feeling of missing someone or something. You can see much more of her work over on Flickr, and you might interested to know Razell is the older sister of young photgorapher Fiddle Oak, featured here last year.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Thrift Store Sculptures by Sayaka Ganz

Artist Sayaka Ganz creates her sculptures using thrift store plastics. Both her Japanese roots and the Japanese Shinto belief that ‘all objects and organisms have spirits’ heavily influence Sayaka. With those as her starting point, she feels that art arise ‘from the passion for fitting odd shapes together and a sympathy toward discarded objects.’